Archive for July, 2011

Peace at Last! by Kate Davis

Tuesday, July 12th, 2011
A response by Kate Davis to Glasgow Museums' Collection

A response by Kate Davis to Glasgow Museums' Collection

I have just been to the preview of Kate Davis’ new exhibition at the Gallery of Modern Art in Glasgow.   It was created specially for GoMA by Kate and is her personal response to Glasgow Museums’ collection.

It’s an interesting exhibition with a mix of Kate’s own work alongside work by Goya, Jo Spence and Terry Dennett among others and has a particular emphasis on feminist art and the women’s suffrage movement. 

I particularly liked the the pamphlet, given extra gravitas by its storage in a glass case, which has a transcript of a speech by Christabel Pankhurst in 1908 outlining the need for a militant approach to securing the women’s right to vote.  The cover of the pamphlet shows a portrait of Christabel which at some time had been defaced and her features almost entirely eradicated and Kate has reproduced the cover of the pamphlet in an enlarged form which heightens the impact of the damage.  She has then reclaimed Pankhurst’s face by drawing in the detail which is missing.  It really makes you stop to think.  There is also a postcard from the early 20th century, called Peace at last!, which has a caricature of a woman’s head with her tongue nailed to a table .. a quite shocking image in 2011.   By the time you reach the Pankhurst pamphlet at the far end of the exhibition you began to understand the need for militant action.

The Goya prints are strange and beautiful and it’s fantastic to have an opportunity to see them close up.  As Goya didn’t leave much information about these prints, there is little knowledge about their intended titles or the sequences in which they should be viewed, and Kate’s interpretation of them, and their role in representing the past, really brings them to life.

There are also video works, which I will go back to the exhibition to take some time to listen to, and the very emotional and moving photographs of Jo Spence taken by Terry Dennet and an intepretation of some of Jo Spence’s photography by Kate in which she considers how the artist addressed the question of who owned the images, especially images of the body.

A very thought provoking exhibition and one which I hope to return to many times during its run.

Peace at last! runs from 13 July to 16 October in the Gallery of Modern Art in Glasgow

Intermezzo offer private evening tours of exhibitions for corporate, luxury travel and conference groups.  For more information contact us on 0141 636 6929 or email us at info@intermezzo-arts.co.uk

Captain Cook Museum

Monday, July 11th, 2011
Image courtesy of Captain Cook Memorial Museum

Image Courtesy of Captain Cook Memorial Museum

Intermezzo are very pleased to be taking part in the Adopt A Museum project in conjunction with Museum140.  Our chosen Museum is the Captain Cook Memorial Museum in Whitby in Yorkshire.  The Museum was opened in 1987 and houses a fantastic collection associated with Cook including original letters, paintings, maps, and Pacific artefacts

The Museum is in Grape Lane, Whitby, in the 17th century Grade I listed house owned by the ship owners Captains Henry and John Walker, to which Cook came as a young man to be apprenticed to the younger brother, John, in 1746.

Cook’s success with a varied diet meant he did not lose a single man to scurvy on all his voyages, contrasting with disastrous losses on earlier sea journeys.

The Museum was the winner of Welcome to Yorkshire’s White Rose Award in 2005 and a finalist again in 2008 and is accredited under the UK’s Museums, Libraries and Archives accreditation scheme.

We look forward to providing many more tales from the Museum and would encourage you to a visit a fascinating Museum telling the story of an influential man in British history.

www.cookmuseumwhitby.co.uk

www.museum140.com

To talk about the Adopt A Museum project on Twitter use the hash tag #adoptamuseum